Home / / Saudi has new plan to fight traffic crime

Saudi has new plan to fight traffic crime

WHO says Kingdom has the world's highest number of deaths from road accidents

18 people die on the roads each day in Saudi Arabia.
18 people die on the roads each day in Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia is set to introduce a new electronic traffic control system called Saher to improve road safety in the country.

The World Health Organization revealed the Kingdom has the world’s highest number of deaths from road accidents, which is now the country’s primary cause of death for adult males aged 16 to 36.  According to estimates from a national study, there are 9 million traffic violations in the Kingdom every year with 18 road-related deaths happening in a day. Last year alone, 6,458 people died on the streets of Saudi Arabia.

The Kingdom is now deploying a new electronic traffic control system called 'Saher'. The system uses a network of digital cameras to monitor traffic which are linked with the National Information Center at the Ministry of Interior. As soon as a violator's car plate is identified, information about the owner is obtained from the national database and a violation ticket is issued.

The ticket will be mailed to the violator's mailing address registered at the National Information Center, but drivers can also find out if they've been issued fines by visiting the Ministry of Interior website or via SMS if they are an STC or Mobily subscriber.

The new system will be linked with command and control centres located in eight cities around the Kingdom, with cameras installed at major traffic lights and cross roads, according to a statement issued by the Traffic Police Directorate over the weekend. It's expected that Saher will go live "within months".

"This system targets reckless drivers who are dangerous to the safety of others and their lives as well as our country's roads from all nationalities without distinction between nationalities," reads information provided on the Saher website.

* This article has been edited since it was originally published due to issues with translation.