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All’s fair in love and war…and Middle East server sales

HP is pulling no punches in the dog-eat-dog world of server sales, rolling out a new migration programme, which it claims makes it easier for ‘dissatisfied’ Sun customers running Solaris on SPARC servers to switch to an x86-based HP ProLiant alternative.

HP is pulling no punches in the dog-eat-dog world of server sales, rolling out a new migration programme, which it claims makes it easier for ‘dissatisfied’ Sun customers running Solaris on SPARC-based servers to switch to an industry-standard x86-based HP ProLiant alternative.

“HP’s 10 years of leadership in the industry-standard server market has allowed ProLiant servers to drive into all areas of the data centre,” commented Ryan D’Souza, product manager, industry standard servers at HP Middle East.

“As standards-based computing continues to be the end goal for customers, more and more Solaris customers are coming to HP for its full portfolio of x86 servers, management tools and services,” he claimed.

HP has extended certification of the 64-bit version of the Solaris 10 operating system on seven of its existing Intel Xeon-based HP ProLiant servers, claiming that this provides users of Solaris on SPARC-based servers with more options that ever for adopting an industry-standard computing platform.

HP claims to have shipped 500,000 more x86-based servers than Sun during the third quarter of 2006. Citing IDC data, HP is also highlighting its position as the number one supplier of UNIX on x86 servers, shipping more than three times the number of units Sun sold in the third quarter of 2006.

To tempt Sun customers into switching, HP has also developed a set of automated tools, system trade-in offers, financial incentives, migration assistance and integrated support capabilities. Since 2004, HP claims to have generated more than US$1 billion in revenues by persuading Sun customers to migrate to HP.

HP has also announced a relationship with Transitive — a specialist in providing software solutions that allow businesses to transport applications across multiple processor and operating system pairs.

Together, HP and Transitive will provide hardware virtualisation and infrastructure solutions for customers that decide to migrate away from SPARC. HP reckons that the solution will allow customers to achieve benefits in terms of price, performance and flexibility using HP ProLiant servers.

Transitive’s QuickTransit software allows applications that have been compiled for the Solaris operating system and the SPARC processor to run on certified 64-bit HP ProLiant platforms running Linux without the need for any source code or binary changes, according to HP.