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Plextor goes Blu

Plextor has become one of the first optical drive manufacturers in the world to launch a PC-based Blu-ray drive through the launch of its new PX-B900A

Plextor has become one of the first optical drive manufacturers in the world to launch a PC-based Blu-ray drive through the launch of its new PX-B900A.

The B900A – Plextor’s first Blu-ray drive - can record to standard recordable and re-recordable Blu-ray media at 2x speed (7.2Mytes/s). The drive can also write to existing single layer discs at 8x (10Mbytes/s) when used with DVD+R, DVD-R and DVD+RW media. Writing to DVD-RW media is done at 6x (7Mbytes/s). Existing dual-layer media on the other hand can be written to at 4x speed (5Mbytes/s). The drive offers 8Mbytes of buffer memory as standard.

Pricing is as yet unannounced and the drive is expected to go on sale in the region in October, carrying a standard two-year warranty.

Blu-ray technology is a new optical disc format, the other being HD (High Definition) DVD. Compared to current DVD drives, which make use of red lasers, Blu-ray drives will make use of a blue-violet laser. Single-layer Blu-ray media can store 25Gbytes of data while double-layer discs can accommodate up to 50Gbytes. Existing DVD media in comparison offers 4.7Gbytes and 8.4Gbytes.

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