Cybercriminals hijack computing power warns Fortinet

Hackers are moving past personal credentials and data to steal CPU resource

Tags: Cloud computingCyber crimeFortinet Incorporation
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Cybercriminals hijack computing power warns Fortinet   Fortinet researchers discovered a new trick used to mine Monero cryptocurrency.
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  October 30, 2017

Fortinet has issued an advisory over how cybercriminals are now turning to browser cryptojacking.

The cybersecurity solutions provider has issued an advisory to computer users to check whether devices are dramatically slowing down.

Fortinet researchers discovered a new trick used to mine Monero cryptocurrency using CPU resources. This is where cybercriminals load a script into a web browser that features a unique site key enabling cybercriminals to earn Monero currency each time a user visits particular websites.

Browser cryptojacking is similar as researchers found that when JavaScript was embedded into a webpage and compromised websites were accessed, the computing power is hijacked for the currency mining process.

This then means the more time spent on the corrupted webpages, the more CPU cycles can be consumed.

Fortinet warns that if the computer's fans are running at full speed with no obvious reason, users should check their CPU usage to discover the culprit and end connection to the compromised website.

To check your CPU usage, follow these instructions:

Access Task Manager on Windows; Activity Monitor on Mac; and Top on Linux command line. Thereafter, select end task, kill, or terminate, respectively.

David Maciejak, director of Security Research, Fortinet, said: "When using computing devices, it pays to always be situationally aware and look out for anomalous things, be it your fan speeding up or an email offering something too good to be true.

"Cyberspace is a perilous place full of schemers trying to take advantage of the gullible. Deploying the right security tools to protect yourself will help, but being cautious and thinking twice before taking any action will also go a long way in preserving your money, confidential data and computing experience."

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