Oracle IoT Cloud adds AI and machine learning

Big Red seeks to make its cloud more attractive to the IoT ecosystem

Tags: Oracle Applications User Group (www.oaug.org/)Oracle CorporationOracle Middle East
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Oracle IoT Cloud adds AI and machine learning The offering now features built-in artificial intelligence and machine learning that powers digital twin and digital thread capabilities.
By  Manda Banda Published  September 7, 2017

Technology powerhouse Oracle has unveiled enhancements to its IoT cloud that include up and coming buzzwords that are still mainly below the radar.

The above the horizon terms are "artificial intelligence" and "machine learning." Soon to be better known, especially for those who work in and around DevOps: "digital twin" and "digital thread."

Big Red said it is touting all four as it seeks to make its cloud more attractive to the IoT ecosystem.

"The offering now features built-in artificial intelligence and machine learning that powers digital twin and digital thread capabilities," Big Red said of its IoT cloud in a statement. "As such, customers and channel partners can quickly gain operation-wide visibility and leverage predictive insights from connected assets. These insights can increase deployment times, reduce costs, improve business outcomes, and accelerate new market opportunities."

Artificial intelligence and its stepchild machine learning need no introduction, but digital twin and digital thread could probably use a little explanation.

"IoT holds the potential to transform today's siloed operations into a modern, interconnected, digital set of workflows with real-time visibility and responsiveness," said Bhagat Nainani, group vice president of IoT Applications at Oracle.

"Oracle continues to push the boundaries of IoT to help our customers significantly simplify their IoT deployments. By receiving real-time data streams enhanced with predictive insights, they can reach new levels of intelligence and a much quicker realisation of ROI."

Oracle needs to find success with its Internet of Things Cloud Service, which it offers as both SaaS and PaaS. For several years it's been facing a shrinking installed base for its tradional database and business offerings and its public IaaS cloud hasn't been getting much traction, despite an aggressive marketing push. It might have trouble finding meaningful IoT success as well, as enterprise users are increasingly seeking to lower costs by avoiding vendor lock-in.

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