Help AG introduces ethical hacking recruitment initiative

Help AG's skills-based recruitment tool has been prompted by the growing need for cyber security professionals in the region

Tags: Cyber crimeHackinghelp AG (www.helpag.com/)
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Help AG introduces ethical hacking recruitment initiative The platform, dubbed ‘Capture the Flag', challenges applicants by testing their ability to identify and solve realistic security vulnerabilities.
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  July 10, 2017

Help AG is working towards tackling the skills shortage within the cyber security industry by launching an ethical hacking recruitment initiative.

The platform, dubbed ‘Capture the Flag', challenges applicants by testing their ability to identify and solve realistic security vulnerabilities. It also rewards applicants for their real-world technical know-how instead of assessing only educational qualifications.  

Help AG has designed the recruitment platform to mimic commonly found exploits used by hackers today, these include SQL Injection, cross-site scripting and software exploitation. Applicants will also be tested on how they conduct vulnerability checks, source code audits and analysis of network packets, but will not be put under a time limit.

Mukhammad Khalilov, manager Security Analysis at Help AG, said: "There is a rich pool of local cyber security talent and we believe that this sort of competition will help us recruit the very best technical resources as we grow our business.

"Over a decade of closely monitoring the IT security landscape in the Middle East has given us keen insight into the main types of attacks and security vulnerabilities that plague regional enterprises. This has enabled us to design the scenarios in a way that best imitates these cyber-attacks. I believe participants will find this both challenging and rewarding as it will truly put their IT skills to the test."

A report from Frost & Sullivan and (ISC)2 found that the global cybersecurity workforce will have more than 1.5 million unfilled positions by 2020. A major factor in this has been the evolution of cyber threats and the inability of traditional academic means to foster the skill sets now needed to combat sophisticated attacks.

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