Commvault: EU businesses must prepare for GDPR compliance

GDPR provides guidelines for organisations in tackling ransomware and leakware threats

Tags: CommVault Systems IncorporatedUnited Arab Emirates
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Commvault: EU businesses must prepare for GDPR compliance Hammer: "There is still plenty of time for organisations to ensure compliance in time for the May 2018 deadline, but they need to move quickly and strategically, and this is where Commvault can help."
By  Alexander Sophoclis Pieri Published  June 3, 2017

Commvault, a global provider of enterprise backup and recovery technologies, has stressed the urgent need for businesses to prepare for the upcoming EU GDPR compliance regulations. Set to go into effect in 12 months' time, the new compliance comes with stiff penalties for organisations that do not comply.

Tackling the ongoing threats of ransomware and leakware, the GDPR compliance outlines several security-related technologies and processes that businesses need to have in order to operate within the European market.

N. Robert Hammer, chairman, president and CEO, Commvault, said: "GDPR has been on the radar of European countries for a while now, but we haven't seen many organisations actively taking steps to become compliant, so now it is crunch time."

He added: "You don't want to be the company in the first week of June 2018 that is used as the poster child for the harsh reality of the penalties laid out by the regulations. There is still plenty of time for organisations to ensure compliance in time for the May 2018 deadline, but they need to move quickly and strategically, and this is where Commvault can help."

Commvault own Data Platform is not only GDPR compliant, but also hosts a myriad of features, which include 72-hour data breach notification, data minimisation, as well as data transfers and portability.

Carla Arend, program director, IDC, said: "Good data management practices are key to GDPR compliance success. Understanding where you have personal data - in which applications, on-premises or in the cloud, which processes use this data, and who owns it - is an important first step."

He said: "If you have not started to prepare, get started now; getting GDPR compliance right takes time. Most European organizations have started preparations, but those outside the EU need to understand how this regulation applies to them as well. A good starting point is addressing unstructured data and devising data governance and management processes that cover data from edge devices to the data centre to the cloud."

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