Dyson’s Supersonic arrives in the Middle East

The Dyson Supersonic hairdryer features the digital motor V9, which was created by 15 motor engineers

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Dyson’s Supersonic arrives in the Middle East Dyson invested £50m in the development of the Dyson Supersonic hairdryer, by creating an art laboratory dedicated to research the science of hair.
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  January 12, 2017

Dyson, typically known for its powerful vacuum cleaners has moved into beauty technology with the release of the Dyson Supersonic hairdryer.

Dyson invested £50m in the development of the Dyson Supersonic hairdryer, by creating an art laboratory dedicated to research the science of hair. Over four years Dyson scientists tested the product on different hair types and built test rigs which mechanically simulate hair drying techniques.

The hairdryer is powered by the digital motor V9, which was created by 15 motor engineers. It is up to eight times faster than other hairdryer motors and half the weight, plus it is engineered to be powerful yet compact it is small enough to be positioned in the handle rather than the head.

James Dyson said: "Hair dryers can be heavy, inefficient and make a racket. By looking at them further we realised that they can also cause extreme heat damage to hair. I challenged Dyson engineers to really understand the science of hair and develop our version of a hair dryer, which we think solves these problems."

The hairdryer has intelligent heat control, helping to ensure hair isn't exposed to excessive temperatures. A glass bead thermistor measures the temperature 20 times a second and transmits this data to the microprocessor, which intelligently controls the patented double-stacked heating element. Also it uses a fast but focused airflow, is engineered for balance in the hand, is quieter than others and intelligently controls the temperature to help protect hair from extreme heat damage.

Furthermore, a team of Dyson aero-acoustic used an axial flow impeller inside the motor to simplify the pathway of the air reducing turbulence and swirling. Also, by giving the motor impeller 13 blades instead of the usual 11, Dyson engineers pushed one tone within the motor to a sound frequency beyond the audible range for humans. 

Other features include, four heat settings, three airflow settings and a cold shot too and it has created three precisely engineered magnetic attachments, with 16 patents pending, to further control this airflow allowing you to achieve a range of different styles.

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