Jackware could be the new ransomware in 2017; ESET

ESET's Trends for 2017 report highlights which emerging technologies will change the cybersecurity landscape

Tags: Cloud computingCyber crimeESET
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Jackware could be the new ransomware in 2017; ESET ESET also highlighted the reality of mobile malware in the context of unstoppable technological developments, which imply new attack scenarios.
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  January 5, 2017

Security software and protection provider ESET has highlighted what emerging risks will threaten the cybersecurity landscape in 2017.

ESET security researcher, Stephen Cobb, revealed that 2016 was the year of ransomware, but 2017 could perhaps be the year of jackware. It means that this could be the year in which the ruthless threat of ransomware migrates to other platforms beyond computers and smartphones, whose primary purpose is not data processing or digital communications.

Cobb and researcher Cameron Camp highlighted that attackers are likely to probe critical infrastructure and will continue to look for ways to cause damage, deny service or hold data hostage.

Lysa Myers, another ESET researcher, discussed the healthcare industry as it continues to become computerised, with more practitioners and patients are using internet-connected medical and fitness devices that are full of sensitive information, to which security and privacy are often an afterthought.

Cassius Puodzius described the potential risks of integrating consoles with computers, in a system that is increasingly internet-dependent and could lead to the exploitation of vulnerabilities, or malware infections aimed at stealing personal, financial and even the game play information of gamers.

ESET also highlighted the reality of mobile malware in the context of unstoppable technological developments, which imply new attack scenarios. The truth is that the rise of virtual reality technology raises new security risks that affect not only digital information, but also users' physical wellbeing.

While these applications collect and store increasingly sensitive data, mobile malware is constantly growing and becoming more complex, therefore reinforcing the importance of, and need for, safe development practices.

With various security issues, ESET also focusses on the human factor. The report said: "We need to keep working until people stop being the weakest link. If we don't, we will remain at a stage in which we have users using latest generation technology, but with security concepts from decades before."

 

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