2.5 million UAE consumers were victim to cybercrime; Norton

Norton Cyber Security Insights Report shows hackers are honing their skills to take advantage of complacent consumers

Tags: Cyber crime
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2.5 million UAE consumers were victim to cybercrime; Norton Tamim Taufiq: "Our findings show that people are growing increasingly aware of the need to protect their personal information online."
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  November 22, 2016

Norton has revealed that 2.53 million consumers in the region have been affected by online cybercrime in the past year.

The annual Norton Cyber Security Insights report highlighted that UAE consumers are the most likely to continue engaging in risky online behavior, leaving themselves vulnerable to further attacks. This is due to the fact many are complacent about protecting their personal information, as 68% are aware that they need to protect their data but continue to click or open malicious attachments from unknown senders.

The report unveiled that millennials are mostly victim to such crimes due to slack online security habits, plus 52% of men and 50% of frequent travellers are also more likely to report incidents of cybercrime.

Tamim Taufiq, head of Norton Middle East, said: "Our findings show that people are growing increasingly aware of the need to protect their personal information online, but aren't motivated to take adequate precautions to stay safe.

"While consumers remain complacent, hackers are refining their skills and adapting their scams to further take advantage of people, making the need for consumers to take some action increasingly important."

Other findings show that consumers acknowledge that risks are real, as 59% believe entering financial information online when using public WiFi is risky. With this said, bad habits are hard to break as 31% share their passwords and 31% fail to see the danger of using the same password across multiple accounts. Furthermore, 21% own at least one unprotected device and 23% are willing to install third party apps to access public WiFi.

Due to this complacent approach, hackers are reaping the awards; 24% admit it is unlikely they would be able to recognise a fraudulent email asking for financial information and 87% have experienced a negative outcome when they have been phished.

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