CompTIA launches campaign to inspire UAE girls to enter technology field

The non-profit association for the technology industry has unveiled research highlighting several critical factors that discourage girls from considering careers in tech.

Tags: CompTIA (www.comptia.org)United Arab Emirates
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CompTIA launches campaign to inspire UAE girls to enter technology field According to a research study conducted by CompTIA, women in MEA occupy only 11.2% of technology leadership roles.
By  Alexander Sophoclis Pieri Published  September 25, 2016

CompTIA, a non-profit association for the technology industry, has recently launched an awareness campaign aimed at encouraging young girls in the UAE to consider a career in technology.

According to a research study conducted by CompTIA, women in MEA occupy only 11.2% of technology leadership roles. At the same time however, women in the region are pioneering the internet business sector, representing 35%of all internet entrepreneurs in the Middle East. The global figure stands at a mere 10% by comparison.

As part of the campaign, CompTIA has released an e-book titled Make Tech Her Story: What Needs to Change to Inspire Girls' Pursuit of IT Careers. Launched in parallel to a companion website, the e-book focuses on encourage tech industry leaders, educators, parents, as well as young girls, to make the industry more gender inclusive.

Mark Plunket, Director of Emerging Markets (Europe and Middle East), CompTIA, said: "Achieving greater gender diversity in our industry requires major changes in the ways girls interact with and learn about technology."

He added: "It will take a concerted, collaborative effort and long-term commitment by parents and role models, teachers and counselors and, most importantly, industry mentors, who can convey their passion about working in tech to future generations."

Additionally, CompTIA's research, which focused on groups of girls between the ages of 10 and 17, also identified several factors deterring young women from considering careers in technology.

These included the lack of parental encouragement, technology focused classes and role models in the industry. Awareness on technology career opportunities and the loss of interest of girls' interest in technology with age were also notable factors.

Carolyn April, senior director, industry research CompTIA, commented: "There are young women and girls in colleges, high schools, middle schools and grade schools that, with the right education and guidance, will be equally capable of doing great things."

The Make Tech Her Story campaign also saw the return of Rosie the Riveter, the cultural icon associated with the women who joined the workforce during World War II. This incarnation of Rosie however, focuses on developing mobile apps, managing IoT and keeping cyber assets safe.

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