Nintendo’s market-share spikes despite Pokemon Go security flaw

Users on the iOS app version were unknowingly granting permissions to their Google accounts

Tags: Augmented realityNintendo Company
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Nintendo’s market-share spikes despite Pokemon Go security flaw The popularity in the game has seen Nintendo's shares surge by a quarter in value, as-well-as topping Apple's free app list. (Getty Images)
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  July 12, 2016

Since the release of Nintendo's augmented reality (AR) app, Pokemon Go, the company's shares have soared in just two days, reaching $7.5bn in market-value.

Pokemon was first released in 1996, now twenty years on, the game has not only been enhanced with AR but it is causing a commotion. The popularity in the game has seen Nintendo's shares surge by a quarter in value, as-well-as topping Apple's free app list.

According to analytics firm SimilarWeb, Pokemon Go was installed on more than 5% of Android devices, and is played on average 43 minutes a day which is more time spent compared to WhatsApp and Instagram, furthermore, the analysts also revealed its daily active users is tie with social network platform Twitter.

In spite of this, a security flaw has come to light. Users who sign into the iOS version of the app via a Google account are unknowingly providing permission to access emails stored by Gmail, trace location history through Google Maps, access Google Photos and Google Drive.

The developers of Pokemon Go, Niantic Labs, released a statement, revealing that it has not received such data and it only requires basic Google profile information, such as user ID and an email address. The developers are now working on a fix.

As Pokemon Go prepares to take over the world, users are trying to capture the little creatures in the most unusual places. Police in Australia's Northern Territory issued a statement advising players to look both ways when crossing the road instead of using their phone and also not to enter a police station whilst on the hunt. More disturbingly, a teenager in Riverton, Wyoming, discovered a man floating in the Wind River when trying to catch a Pokemon from a natural water resource and armed robbers in Missouri used the game to target victims.

At present the game is only available in the US, Australia and New Zealand, however due to server issues, a further global rollout is on hold until the issues have been solved.

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