Google to end passwords on Android apps

Google announces Project Abacus will be tested at financial institutions first before rolling out to developers

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Google to end passwords on Android apps At Google I/O 2015, Google explained that Project Abacus is a result of humans remembering their actions and habits more so than passwords. (Getty Images)
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  May 24, 2016

At this year's Google I/O, Google announced the relaunch of Project Abacus, a plan to replace passwords with smart authentication.

The project was originally presented at last year's Google I/O, where the search engine giant proposed the authentication process could analyse the way users type, swipe, move and talk to enable access to Android apps without needing a password or fingerprint match.

This year, Google announced it will begin trials with several large financial institutions. Dan Kaufman, head of Google's ATAP (Advanced Technologies and Projects) division, where the Project Abacus idea was incubated, also revealed if the trials go well, it will then be rolled out to every Android developer by the end of the year.

The passwords will be replaced with "trust scores" which means it will assess specific user patterns as-well-as current location and facial recognition. Google's Trust API will run in the background to monitor the devices to provide the trust scores. Google has stated that some apps require different levels of trust scores, for instance financial apps would require a higher score.

At Google I/O 2015, Google explained that Project Abacus is a result of humans remembering their actions and habits more so than passwords. Therefore Project Abacus can analyse these patterns and use sensors in the device to detect if the user is actually them.

Related: In pics: Google I/O 2016

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