CIOs slow to respond to network breaches in UAE

Carbon Black survey shows CIOs in the UAE face pressure to effectively handle a cyber-attack

Tags: Carbon Black (https://www.carbonblack.com/)Cyber crimeUnited Arab Emirates
  • E-Mail
CIOs slow to respond to network breaches in UAE Carbon Black's Ben Johnson: "It has never been an effective strategy to wait for hackers to make a mistake and expose themselves before your network security team acts on it."
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  May 10, 2016

Carbon Black, endpoint security solutions provider, revealed 66% of CIOs in UAE face pressure to effectively prevent, detect and quickly respond to costly cyber-attacks.

The survey exposed that many organisations remain vulnerable as endpoint security to protect their devices is overlooked. Roughly 83% of respondents revealed that their primary security tool is a firewall, while only 3% opt to deploy advanced endpoint protection that goes beyond anti-virus software.

Despite such measures are put in a place, 71% of those surveyed said it takes one to two weeks to uncover network intrusions, but 29% of CIOs are not worried about the slow response rate. Additionally, 78% are completely confident in knowing what systems and data would be affected if they were to suffer a breach.

Ben Johnson, chief security strategist at Carbon Black, said: "It has never been an effective strategy to wait for hackers to make a mistake and expose themselves before your network security team acts on it. Just like the attackers, an organisation's team must be equally, if not more, determined, sophisticated, and well-funded.

"We know for a fact that many security teams are still unable to prioritise threats because of the huge volume of alerts they receive. Companies need to automate processes where possible to enable their security teams to counter threats and paralyse hackers during an attack, rather than just picking up the pieces in the aftermath of the attack."

Attackers can still easily infiltrate an organisation's vital information by hacking endpoint devices through human interaction. Many hackers use social engineering, a tool that relies heavily on human interaction, to gain access to secure data.

Overall, 80.5% of the respondents agree that security vendors need to collaborate more to provide their customers with contextual information about the threats they see. This further bolsters Carbon Black's advocacy for security vendors to unite to ward off cyber threats.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code