Google fined by French body for failing to forget

Data protection watchdog slaps Google with a $112,000 for failing to widen ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling

Tags: Google Incorporated
  • E-Mail
Google fined by French body for failing to forget Since 2014, the public has asked for 1.4m search results to be removed, Google has complied with roughly 40% of them
By  Aasha Bodhani Published  March 27, 2016

The French privacy authority has fined Google $112,000 for failing to comply with the ‘right to be forgotten' rule as previously ordered.

The Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertes (CNIL) said in a statement said it fined the Internet search giant for not scrubbing web results widely enough in response to the EU privacy ruling.

In 2014 the European Court of Justice ruled that people could request that search engines, such as Google, to remove embarrassing posts or outdated and irrelevant information about themselves from search results. Earlier this year, Google said it would widen the ‘right to be forgotten' requests across the European Union, after it faced pressure from EU regulators.

Google complied and search results removed were only from European versions of Google, such as google.de or google.fr. However, Google refused to do this globally, stating it would infringe on people's rights to freedom of expression.

Due to Google's refusal, the CNIL said its citizens' rights should be applied globally and Google's failure to "delist" links from search results outside the EU has resulted in a fine. The watchdog also said there is no violation for freedom of expression because delisting to all extensions does not involve deletion of content from the Internet. 

"For people residing in France to effectively exercise their right to be delisted, it must be applied to the entire processing operation, i.e. to all of the search engine's extensions," stated CNIL.

Google, however, disagrees. Google spokesperson Al Verney stated that it plans to appeal the ruling, claiming that CNIL does not have the authority to control content that people outside of France can access.

Since 2014, the public has asked for 1.4m search results to be removed, Google has complied with roughly 40% of them.

Related: Google's widens ‘right to be forgotten' across EU

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code