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With continued strain being put on national electricity grids in many African countries, load shedding practices have now evolved into rolling blackouts, which are having adverse effects on industries across the spectrum. How can your solution provider business benefit from rolling power outages by helping customers develop comprehensive business continuity strategies?

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Always on Business ContinuitySA CEO Michael Davies, says solution providers need to understand that load-shedding is going to occur and, in order to put they first need to understand what the implications are.
By  Kaunda Chama Published  June 1, 2015

With continued strain being put on national electricity grids in many African countries, load shedding practices have now evolved into rolling blackouts, which are having adverse effects on industries across the spectrum. How can your solution provider business benefit from rolling power outages by helping customers develop comprehensive business continuity strategies?

With continued strain being put on national electricity grids in Southern African nations, load shedding practices have now evolved into rolling blackouts which are having adverse effects on industries across the spectrum. Millions of dollars are being lost through lost production time and, left to continue, this could potentially cripple economies in this region.

However, before more power stations are constructed in these markets, there are alternative solutions that can be employed.

Stuart Scanlon, sales director at New Era Solutions, an authorised Epicor partner in South Africa, stated that power management solutions are crucial especially to manufacturers to keep their production on track and minimise their power usage during tough times.

Scanlon said with Africa's power shortage seeming like it is here to stay, businesses are not only looking for ways to keep “the lights on”, they are investigating means to improve their energy efficiency without compromising on productivity.

He added that organisations in the manufacturing sector in particular now have to take a serious look at their consumption and may be facing the possibility of significant increases in the cost of power during peak periods if they can't cut back on their usage.

“As some of the most prolific power consumers, manufacturers are often the first port of call when it comes to alleviating the pressure on national grids, but at the same time they can have perishable raw materials that won't wait and customers that demand the same high levels of service,” Scanlon noted.

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