IT salary survey 2014: The results

ACN’s annual IT Salary Survey aims to shine a light on the state of remuneration in the region’s IT sector

Tags: Bayt.comCompTIA (www.comptia.org)HR Source Consulting (www.hrsource.ae)Pedersen & Partners (www.pedersenandpartners.com/)Salary
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IT salary survey 2014: The results The 2014 ACN IT Salary Survey received 386 qualified responses from IT professionals working in the Middle East.
By  Mark Sutton Published  November 25, 2014

Staff retention

The IT sector in the Middle East remains a highly dynamic market in terms of staff moving jobs. According to this year’s survey, 60% of workers will look to shift jobs within two years. The churn of staff can represent a problem for companies in retaining knowledge, project planning and maintaining staff levels.

According to a 2013 survey by employment portal Bayt.com, IT has the second highest turnover of any job function in the region.

Suhail Masri, VP Sales at Bayt.com, said this can be a problem for all organisations: “Employee retention is pivotal for ensuring the smooth functioning of an organisation as well as growing and developing internal talent and knowledge. The perception of employee retention in the region is quite low, and not just in the IT industry.”

Masri said that senior executives and management in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region are easier to retain than junior employees, which could be because 45% of professionals in those roles see it harder to change jobs as you rise up the career ranks.

Click here to view the ACN Salary Survey 2014

Daiga Trumpe, Principal, Head of Technology Practice Group, Middle East & Africa, Pedersen & Partners, said there is more focus from companies in the region on talent retention, which marks a growing maturity from the market.

“Talent retention is one of top priorities of high tech companies operating in the region, because human capital is a key asset to stay on the competitive edge and ensure sustainable business growth. The recent trend is focus on longer term incentives, professional development opportunities, succession planning and other employee engagement and loyalty programs to keep the best talents on the board,” she said.

“We see high mobility more as emerging/fast growing economy element than anything IT industry specific — the fact is that mobility tends to be much higher in emerging growing markets than in mature established ones.”

John McGlinchey, Senior Vice President, Global Business Development at CompTIA, added that high mobility may also be a trait of a new generation.

“Along with the high demand for technical skills which could drive employees to find a better offer, there is a growing sense that those employees recently entering the workforce are more likely to switch jobs while looking for a good match. CompTIA data shows that 80% of employees feel that low loyalty among younger workers is a common stereotype, with 53% feeling that there is some truth to that stereotype. While this trend may diminish over time, the current reality is that companies do face some difficulty in retaining knowledge and building a consistent workforce.”

Masri said that employers can implement certain practices to increase their retention rates. Salary and benefits packages are the primary factor, with 45% of respondents saying they switched job because their pay was too low.

“Another way to retain employees is to instill a sense of job security. 46.1% professionals in the MENA say that companies offering job security guarantees would improve retention, while 44.7% state that fear of getting fired guides their decision to change jobs to a large extent. In order to increase employee loyalty, employers must value their employees, and instill sufficient encouragement and motivation,” he said.

“Finally, companies should know that employees tend to put more effort into their jobs when they feel valuable to their company. If you invest in your employees and cater to their professional needs, they’re most likely to invest right back in their jobs.”

Click here to view the ACN Salary Survey 2014

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