83% of firms under-prepared for security incident

Survey shows that 39% have no incident response plans in place.

Tags: Arbor Networks (www.arbornetworks.com/)Cyber crimeEconomist Intelligence Unit
  • E-Mail
83% of firms under-prepared for security incident Samy: Enterprises are increasingly experiencing data breaches, denial of service attacks, systems errors and outages
By  Tom Paye Published  March 20, 2014

Only 17% of businesses globally are fully prepared for an online security incident, according to findings from a recent Economist Intelligence Unit survey commissioned by Arbor Networks.

The survey, which gathered data from 360 senior business leaders around the world, also showed that, despite 76% of companies suffering an incident over the past two years, 39% still have no incident response plans in place.

Mahmoud Samy, Arbor's area head for the Middle East, Pakistan and Afghanistan, said that, despite the alarming numbers, the survey showed signs that businesses were beginning to understand the need for incident response plans.

"Middle East enterprises are increasingly experiencing data breaches, denial of service attacks, systems errors and outages, having a significant impact in terms of business disruption, financial losses and loss of reputation," he said.

"Regional organisations are waking up to the fact that they need to manage these data-related incidents more effectively by having response plans, technology and systems in place to guard against potential internal and external threats."

The survey also showed that prepared firms typically rely on their IT departments to lead incident response actions. However, many are drawing on external resources such as IT forensic experts, specialist legal advisors and law enforcement experts.

"There is an encouraging trend towards formalizing corporate incident response preparations. But with the source and impact of threats becoming harder to predict, executives should make sure that incident response becomes an organisational reflex rather than just a plan pulled down off the shelf," said James Chambers, a senior editor at The Economist Intelligence Unit.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code