High density data centres are best

Building a modular data centre, or a high density data centre are the best approaches to reduce the spiraling enterprise energy costs and maintain power usage effectiveness

Tags: CommScope Incorporation
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High density data centres are best Ciaran Forde says that the capacity of a data centre is based on the size of the computer room space.
By  Georgina Enzer Published  September 9, 2013

Building a modular data centre, or a high density data centre are the best approaches to reduce the spiraling enterprise energy costs and maintain power usage effectiveness (PUE), according to Ciarán Forde, vice president, Enterprise Sales, Middle East and Africa at data centre specialist CommScope.

According to CommScope, enterprise IT managers and facilities management are often challenged to fit more computing equipment into less space in the data centre.

The current popular design strategy is to balance lower capital and operation cost with high availability and efficiency within the data centre.

“In the enterprise, through virtualisation technology and effective design we are seeing some data centres being able to better use the available white space by as much as 75%, by adopting a high density server usage approach versus low to medium density,” said Forde.

The capacity of a data centre is based on the size of the computer room space (floor space available for IT and telecommunications equipment), and the capacity of the IT, power and cooling systems per unit of computer room floor space. High-density data centres have a higher capacity of power and or cooling per unit of computer room floor space. This allows for a higher density of server, switching and storage in the data centre space.

A balance between space and capacity needs to be determined at the outset when designing a new data centre and when modifying an existing data centre space, according to CommScope.

This space vs capacity balance will depend on the type of IT and telecommunications systems the data centre is going to support and the number or combination of those systems which are to be placed within each cabinet or rack within the data centre.

“Building new data centre objectives have to majorly contribute to improving revenues in the enterprise, and reduce expenses for the business, for example building co-location data centres will have different drivers than building in house data centre for the enterprises,” said Forde.

Previous reports from IT research company Forrester illustrates the upward trend in server consolidation achieved through virtualisation.

It also illustrates that there are  three main reasons for consolidating servers, these are; cutting hardware costs, improving business continuity and disaster recovery strategies and capabilities and significantly reclaiming the data centre floor space there by increasing both the data centre density and efficiency.

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