Green is great

Green IT, or more precisely the reduction in energy costs in the enterprise data centre is a growing regional trend due to very high commercial electricity prices, particularly in the UAE.

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Green is great
By  Georgina Enzer Published  September 9, 2013

Green IT, or more precisely the reduction in energy costs in the enterprise data centre is a growing regional trend due to very high commercial electricity prices, particularly in the UAE.

However, green IT is not just about reducing your energy costs and it has been exciting delving into the innovations in green IT and the green supply chain for this issue.

Dell displayed some innovative problem solving after Hurricane Sandy in 2012, when one of its customers found that all of its servers were full of water.

Instead of advising the customer to throw the servers away and start again, technicians’ descended on the servers bearing sacks of rice. The servers were taken apart and filled with rice for a few days, the rice was then removed and the servers started up as normal. An innovative, green and organic way of fixing waterlogged servers.  Many IT companies are beginning to implement the green ethos all the way down their supply chain, particularly in global companies with a local presence.

Some company top-management have to now stay in hotels with green ratings on business trips and companies such as R&M, headquartered in Switzerland is using geothermal energy to power its headquarters, named the Cube. The same geothermal principal was recently used in a regional speed camera installation, where the speed cameras are powered by both geothermal energy and solar power.

It is great to see how green practices in IT are beginning to gain a foothold in the UAE. This country has one of the highest carbon footprints per capita in the world, it is high time enterprises began looking at a way to reduce this.

Green IT, or more precisely the reduction in energy costs in the enterprise data centre is a growing regional trend due to very high commercial electricity prices, particularly in the UAE.

However, green IT is not just about reducing your energy costs and it has been exciting delving into the innovations in green IT and the green supply chain for this issue.

Dell displayed some innovative problem solving after Hurricane Sandy in 2012, when one of its customers found that all of its servers were full of water.

Instead of advising the customer to throw the servers away and start again, technicians’ descended on the servers bearing sacks of rice. The servers were taken apart and filled with rice for a few days, the rice was then removed and the servers started up as normal. An innovative, green and organic way of fixing waterlogged servers.  Many IT companies are beginning to implement the green ethos all the way down their supply chain, particularly in global companies with a local presence.

Some company top-management have to now stay in hotels with green ratings on business trips and companies such as R&M, headquartered in Switzerland is using geothermal energy to power its headquarters, named the Cube. The same geothermal principal was recently used in a regional speed camera installation, where the speed cameras are powered by both geothermal energy and solar power.

It is great to see how green practices in IT are beginning to gain a foothold in the UAE. This country has one of the highest carbon footprints per capita in the world, it is high time enterprises began looking at a way to reduce this.

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