Solving data centre challenges

Chetan Parekh, regional sales manager – Systems and Technology Group at Gulf Business Machines, talks about the strategies used to solve the issues related to data centres and the benefits of automated systems.

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Solving data centre challenges Parekh says businesses are demanding more from their IT departments and want fast delivery of projects.
By  Chetan Parekh Published  July 26, 2013

Chetan Parekh, regional sales manager – Systems and Technology Group at Gulf Business Machines, talks about the strategies used to solve the issues related to data centres and the benefits of automated systems.

One of the major issues facing many corporations is the non-availability of power in the data centre. Previously, more focus had been given to finding solutions to the expensive power and cooling costs for data centres or how to support the infrastructure installed on the ground and how the level of utilisation of the servers can drive server sprawl and extremely high software costs. These operational expenses can consume up to 70% of the IT budget leaving much less for the purpose of projects that deliver new business value. These inefficiencies not only affect the cost models adversely, but also impact the timely delivery of IT projects.

In order to solve the most important data centre inefficiencies, three important costs need to be curtailed: The low utilisation levels in servers resulting in server sprawl, the higher cost of software licences and finally the high cost of managing these systems. The first two can be managed by consolidating and virtualising, while the third aspect of the cost can be solved by simplified management and control.

Today, businesses are demanding more from their IT department and want to deliver projects faster. Rapid provisioning of IT assets is a necessity more relevant than any time before. Since the Middle East region is going through a growth explosion, IT needs to be an enabler and not a road-block to the requirements of the business.

Automation can facilitate rapid provisioning and significantly reduce the system management time and costs. Integrated systems should be included at the factory based on best practices. One of the key benefits of this is that the system once delivered to the customers would need just a few hours rather than weeks to be up and running. This translates to faster provisioning and lesser time to market for customers. Furthermore, ordering pre-integrated systems can cut down months off a typical procurement cycle.

The trend of smart cities has gained popularity due to automated systems. Automated systems have impacted our daily lives, even outside of the impact they have on IT teams. For example, seeing a city’s traffic in a consolidated, real-time view can help anticipate problems, alleviate congestion and decrease emergency-response times.

Intelligent transportation systems enable advanced analysis of the many factors that make up traffic flow, and give planners and responders a comprehensive look at the state of their city’s roadways on ground level. The start-up investments for these new systems can be as low as AED130,000 ($35,000). GBM works extensively with customers to help them plan and design their requirements through consultative engagements.

Note from the author:

The opinions expressed in this article are Chetah Parekh’s own views and may not in anyway represent GBM’s perspective, position, strategies or outlook of its business in the Middle East region.

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