Iraq to buy 50,000 Dell PCs for schools

Ministry of Education does Dell deal to rebuild school IT education

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Iraq to buy 50,000 Dell PCs for schools The project is part of the Ministry of Education's plans to rebuild the education system.
By  Mark Sutton Published  November 7, 2012

The Iraqi Ministry of Education has signed a deal with Dell to deploy 50,000 desktop PCs in 4,000 schools in central Iraq.

The deal is intended to help revamp IT learning and resources in Iraqi schools, which have suffered due to international sanctions, conflict and import challenges, meaning access to IT in classrooms has been negligible.

The deal will see the multi-phase deployment of 50,000 Dell OptiPlex 380 PCs which are designed to provide cost efficient, long life cycle PCs, plus monitors, which will benefit 200,000 Iraqi students.

The deal is part of the Ministry’s overall plans to restructure the country’s education system, which includes rebuilding schools and opening new schools, updating curricula and academic skills and improving policies and management.

Naif Hussen, general director of Information Technology, Iraq Ministry of Education commented: “The Ministry of Education is keen to develop Iraq’s education system in line with global standards, and our primary area of concern is technology. We will enable students across Iraq with modern, state-of-the-art facilities, which will serve as a platform for their complete syllabus.

“We chose Dell OptiPlex systems because they are cost efficient, powerful and expandable. Most importantly, Dell demonstrated their commitment to our cause through the team’s loyalty and stability over more than three years in working on bringing this project to fruition,” he added.

 “A whole generation of Iraqi children have had very limited exposure to technology for nearly a decade,” said Dave Brooke, general manager, Dell Middle East. “Dell is honoured to have a role in helping to rebuild the country’s education system and introducing the power of technology to Iraqi children.”

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