Egypt students head to international science fair

Students will compete with 1,500 high school students for over $4m in prizes

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Egypt students head to international science fair Five students from Egypt will be heading to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair 2011 which is being held in Los Angeles this week. (Getty Images)
By  Georgina Enzer Published  May 10, 2011

Five students from Egypt are taking part in Intel's International Science and Engineering Fair 2011 which is being held in Los Angeles this week.

Over 1,500 high school students from 443 affiliate fairs in 65 countries, regions and territories are competing in the fair to share ideas, showcase their research and inventions, and compete for more than $4m in awards. The EMEA region is well represented with 198 participants from 33 countries.

Each of the students chosen for the finals earned top honours at local and regional science and engineering competitions.

"The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair is not only an opportunity for our Egyptian youth to come together and showcase the quality and depth of their scientific research, but it also gives them the chance to share their passion with peers and to be rewarded for their intellectual curiosity. They are the best ambassadors for math, sciences and technology," said Nihal Abbas, Intel Egypt corporate affairs manager.

Research projects and topics undertaken by this year's finalists include earthquake detection, oil spill cleanup, and energy-efficient wind turbine technology, response technology for natural disasters such as tsunamis, Alzheimer's research, and alternative chemotherapy treatments.

The students from Egypt will be showcasing a range of research including; a project that looks at replacing fossil fuels for motor vehicles with a form of alternative fuel created out of Nitrogen 13, a changeable substance that explodes when subjected to any frequency in car engines; the impact of negative memories on the performance of the individual and how these memories can be used to adjust the performance; and a reactor that helps increase the production of hydrogen from termites, which can then be used as a source of energy.

The prizes for the winners include the $75,000 Gordon E. Moore award and two Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards of $50,000 each; more than $4m total prizes are also up for grabs.

2330 days ago
sayed

Viva Egyptian Youth, Egypt will return back to it deserved place,

25 Jan - revolution youth

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