Symantec to release new safety solution in 2011

The new encryption system is designed to protect users from device and data theft

Tags: Access controlAnti-spamAntiVirusSymantec CorporationUnited Arab Emirates
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Symantec to release new safety solution in 2011 Johnny Karam, the regional director of MENA, Symantec said that the company is constantly innovating to address evolving online threats.
By  Georgina Enzer Published  November 14, 2010

Symantec is expanding its encryption solution set with the upcoming launch of PGP Whole Disk Encryption. The software contains support for Intel Anti-Theft Technology, Symantec Endpoint Encryption (SEE) Removable Storage Edition with integrated Symantec Data Loss Prevention capabilities, Symantec Endpoint Encryption Device Control and the newest version of Symantec Endpoint Encryption Full Disk Edition.

"As security threats continue to evolve and confidential information proliferates to a wide array of endpoints, Symantec has innovated to address the new needs in the market," said Johnny Karam, regional director - MENA, Symantec.  "Symantec's goal is to provide effective, easy-to-use information protection products with the management capabilities needed to address today's stringent privacy and compliance regulations."

The integration of Symantec's Intel Anti-Theft Technology into PGP Whole Disk Encryption is designed to help users to protect their devices and data, while helping to prevent notebook computer thefts, protect systems during shipping, and lower the cost of decommissioning older hardware. 

Intel's hardware-based asset protection and theft deterrence solution allows network administrators to disable functionality on these corporate assets after a theft or loss remotely. 

Managed by PGP Universal Server, a lost or stolen notebook can be disabled via local detection mechanisms or through the transmission of a "poison pill" by the administrator. The system can be reactivated if the device is recovered.

"According to the Ponemon Institute, the leading causes of data breaches are loss or theft of mobile devices, and the average cost of a data breach is more than $6.75 million in the US and approximately $3.4 million globally," said Anand Pashupathy, general manager of Anti-Theft Services, Inte. "PGP Whole Disk Encryption with Intel Anti-Theft Technology combines the best attributes of software and hardware into a robust solution helping to provide businesses mobility with peace of mind."

PGP Whole Disk Encryption will also offer increased endpoint performance through support for Intel AES-NI technology. The AES-NI instruction set is designed to accelerate cryptographic operations, and can decrease the time required to encrypt a laptop by up to 40%, according to the company, while increasing throughput on solid state drives (SSDs).

Symantec Endpoint Encryption Device Control also manages use of portable storage devices and media drives by monitoring device usage and file transfer activity, controlling access to ports, devices and wireless networks, and restricting users' ability to copy protected information.

PGP Whole Disk Encryption with support for Intel Anti-Theft Technology version 2.0 will be available in 2011, subject to US trade compliance approval.  Symantec Endpoint Encryption Device Control, Symantec Endpoint Encryption Removable Storage Edition and Symantec Endpoint Encryption Full Disk with support for Mac OS X are scheduled to be available in winter 2011.

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