A call for more bandwidth

Motorola and Minerva have teamed up at GITEX TECHNOLOGY WEEK to highlight what they claim is the ideal solution to the bandwidth shortage threatening almost all businesses in the Middle East.

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A call for more bandwidth Motorola and Minerva want to clear the region’s crowded internet highways by using microwave technology.
By  ITP.net Staff Writer Published  October 19, 2010

Motorola and Minerva have teamed up at GITEX TECHNOLOGY WEEK to highlight what they claim is the ideal solution to the bandwidth shortage threatening almost all businesses in the Middle East.

Both companies are warning that bandwidth shortages will become as disruptive as electricity blackouts for business in the Middle East if telecoms operations continue on their current path, and are urging them to begin considering microwave technology as an alternative to laying underground cables.

Pointing to the rise of devices like the iPad and other mobile devices, the companies said that time is running out for telecoms operators to act, and that burying their heads in the sand will only serve to exacerbate the issues that many of them are already facing in the region to do with bandwidth demand.

“This problem is only going to increase in the next couple of years as more and more companies and consumers begin to consume increasing amounts of mobile content,” says Minerva’s Leo Psara. “Motorola’s microwave solution allows bandwidth providers to bolster their provision, both in the long and the short term without the need to lay expensive underground cabling.”

According to Nader Baghdadi, Regional Sales Manager for Motorola, one of the biggest benefits versus laying physical cable is the almost immediate increase in bandwidth provision, while maintaining a low operating expenditure. “End users are looking at ways to add value to their products, and many of those services have higher and higher requirements for bandwidth,” says Baghdadi.

“There is a mentality amongst many providers that the solutions are expensive to implement, but it isn’t significantly higher than laying undersea cables, and the added benefit is that they’re easier to maintain and the extra bandwidth becomes available much quicker,” adds Baghdadi.

2448 days ago
Berndde

But microwaves aren't healthy, and I know the fears of uninformed (or misguided) people concerning radioactivity...I see a problem...
They'll want the product, but not the producer.

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