Larry Ellison best paid CEO of the decade

Oracle CEO made $1.84 billion in past decade, says Wall Street Journal

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Larry Ellison best paid CEO of the decade Ellison oversaw a three-fold increase in Oracle stock value over the past decade. (Getty Images)
By  Mark Sutton Published  July 28, 2010

Larry Ellison, the CEO and founder of Oracle was the top earning executive of the last decade, according to a survey by the Wall Street Journal.

The survey of top publically-listed US companies found that Ellison ranked as the highest paid executive of the noughties, making $1.84 billion from 2000 to 2009.

The survey calculated results based on salaries, bonuses, perks and realized gains on both restricted stock and stock options. Ellison has frequently rated as the best paid executive in US in the past.

Technology executives feature prominently on the top 25 list, with Barry Diller of multi-brand internet company IAC/InterActive coming second, with $1.14 billion.

Despite only taking a $1 per year salary, Apple CEO Steve Jobs was fourth on the list, with $749 million, mainly from a $647 million gain on restricted stock that was granted in 2003 and vested in 2006.

Other tech executives making the cut included Terry Semel of Yahoo! in 8th place with $489.6m, Michael Dell in 12th with $454m, Irwin Jacobs of Qualcomm in 15th with $436.8m and Cisco's John Chambers making $393.2m in 17th place.

Notably absent from the list was Bill Gates, who was not included as he stepped down as CEO in 2000, and retired as an employee in 2008, although he remains chairman of the company.

The WSJ noted that not all of the top earner's companies enjoyed a growth in share price over the decade. While Oracle stock tripled and Apple stock grew almost 12 times, Dell shares lost 66% of their value.

The list was compiled in association with Kevin Murphy, the Kenneth L. Trefftzs Chair in Finance at the University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business using data from Standard & Poor's Execucomp service, which tracks proxy statements filed with the US SEC.

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