Extreme boosts Ethernet switching range

New addition to BlackDiamond series increases network longevity and helps lower the carrier’s total cost of ownership

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Extreme boosts Ethernet switching range Aziz Ala-Ali at Extreme Networks claims the new BlackDiamond will provide carriers with lasting value.
By  Julian Pletts Published  November 18, 2009

Extreme Networks has broadened its carrier product portfolio with the announcement of its new BlackDiamond 20804 Ethernet Transport switch.

This latest addition to the BlackDiamond 20800 Series of carrier Ethernet switches increases network longevity by enabling carriers to expand video and other services on their network. It also offers pro-active service management tools and apparently helps lower the carrier's cost of ownership.

"Carriers around the world are deploying next-generation networks to enable an array of services that fulfill subscribers' increasing expectations for an outstanding service experience," said Aziz Ala'ali, regional director at Extreme Networks Middle East and Africa office.

"Our new BlackDiamond 20804 Ethernet Transport switch joins the BlackDiamond 20808 to offer a broad range of Ethernet Transport solutions that will provide carriers with lasting value as they deploy next-generation networks," added Ala'ali.

For Tier 2 and Tier 3 carriers migrating from SONET/SDH and one Gigabit Ethernet rings to 10 Gigabit Ethernet rings, the BlackDiamond 20804 provides 120 Gbps per slot line-rate switching capacity in a 4-slot chassis, supporting up to 32 line-rate 10 GE ports per chassis today, with ample bandwidth for future 100 GE IO Modules, and is designed for future switch fabric upgrades to enable 480 Gbps of switching capacity per slot. 

The vendor also claims that its support for backbone bridges enables carriers to scale their aggregation networks using reliable, industry-standard Ethernet protocols and that video service delivery is accelerated with multicast quality hardware resources, to ensure video multicast traffic gets to the subscriber no matter how busy the network.

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