Networking VAR launches new service in ME

DiData expands offering by introducing lifecycle assessment service to the region

Tags: AssessmentDimension DataUnited Arab Emirates
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Networking VAR launches new service in ME Nader Atout says DiData’s new service enables firms to expand their network asset planning activities beyond a single vendor.
By  Andrew Seymour Published  October 6, 2009

Networking integrator Dimension Data has made its technology lifecycle assessment service available to customers in the Middle East.

The company says the time has come to offer the service regionally after carrying out more than 300 assessments globally during the past 18 months.

"This service enables organisations to expand their network asset planning activities beyond a single manufacturer," explained Nader Atout, sales director for the Gulf region at Dimension Data. "It also provides the foundation for expanding asset planning beyond network assets to include server platforms and storage devices among others."

Atout adds that the assessment includes the ability to identify serial information and provide clients with maintenance coverage information.

Prior to rolling the service out in the Middle East, Dimension Data added a series of new features and increased automation in a bid to make it easier for clients to remove "risk, waste and uncertainty" from their IT infrastructures.

Rich Schofield, global business development manager for network integration at Dimension Data, says the first batch of assessments carried out showed that almost three quarters of networking devices were running with known security vulnerabilities.

It also revealed that almost half of all network devices were found to have entered the obsolescence cycle, putting them at risk of extended downtime and unplanned investment to regain business continuity.

"The great irony is that every one of these problems is avoidable through appropriate lifecycle management that allows companies to maximise the useful life of its network assets with a rational approach that minimises risk," said Schofield. "Organisations that don't get the help that's available now could find they're being held hostage by their networks in the near future."

Schofield says some industry analysts calculate that system downtime can cost as much as US$42,000 per hour in a large corporate and almost 4% of an organisation's annual revenue. A typical business is reported to experience around 87 hours of downtime a year. 

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