Intel delivers first 34nm solid state drives

Intel has announced its new solid state drives that use a 2.5 inch 34 nanometer multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memory

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Intel delivers first 34nm solid state drives Intel has announced its new solid state drives that use a 2.5 inch 34 nanometer multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memory.
By  Gareth Van Zyl Published  July 22, 2009

Intel has announced its new solid state drives that use a 2.5 inch 34 nanometer multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memory, which, the corporation says, offers more speed and will help reduce prices by up to 60% for computer manufacturers and consumers.

Intel’s multi-level (MLC) X25-M Mainstream SATA SSD is available in 80GB and 160GB versions and it is drop-in replacement for Intel’s older 50nm drives.

The company says that the X25-M offers improved latency and faster random write Input/Output Operations Per Second (IOPS). The new SSD provides a 25% reduction in latency, which allows for quicker access to data, and which operates at 65-microsecond latency.

Some of its technical specifications include bandwidth that has sustained sequential read of up to 250 Mbps and a sustained sequential write of up to 70 Mbps, making these drives some of the fastest around.

The new drives are set to slot straight into any SATA application such as notebooks, desktop PCs and even blade servers.

The channel prices for the X25-M 80GB are US $225 for quantities of up to 1,000 units while the 160GBversion is US $440 for quantities of up to 1,000 units. The drives will further support Microsoft Windows 7.

Solid State Drives or SSDs offer faster performance and are more durable than hard disk drives, and these drives have played a role in spurring on the rise in popularity of thin notebooks and netbooks.

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