The show goes on

Recent tough economic times have not prevented big computer expos from being staged. January 2009 has already kicked off with two shows.

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By  Gareth Van Zyl Published  January 12, 2009

It may be tough times, but that hasn’t prevented the big computer expos from being staged. January 2009 has already kicked off with the Macworld Expo and the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Both shows have revealed some technology developments for the year ahead.

Over the past week it’s been the turn of CES in Las Vegas. There have been some interesting products on show such as nVidia’s GeForce 3D Vision Glasses Kit, which gives PC game players the opportunity to have a stereoscopic 3D gaming experience. The glasses work with a large number of games such as Assassin's Creed, Age of Empires 3 and Call of Duty 4.

Another new product on the horizon is the Asus Eee Keyboard. Asus (which has had great success with its Eee PC) has combined the familiar Intel-based netbook specs, wireless High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) and a 5 inch touch-screen that can show the full Windows XP desktop. It could launch by the end of this year, and it could run Windows 7 (if Windows 7 is released by that time).

Display technologies have also got their fair share of exposure at CES. Samsung Mobile's MBP200 Pico Projector can display as big as a 50 inch viewing area. It also has a music player, a video player, a 2.2 inch screen, external speakers, and support for Microsoft Office and PDF formats.

In terms of touch-screen display technology; HP, Asus, Shuttle, and MSI have all unveiled new touch screen-capable all-in-one PCs at CES 2009.

CES has had other attractions as well. Protestors - dressed up as zombie TVs - invaded CES last week to protest the lack of effective recycling and take back programs from HDTV manufacturers.

Protestors aside though, to see some of the products on show at CES, one can take a look at the photo gallery on the ITP.net website dedicated to CES by clicking here.

The other big conference and expo, Macworld 2009, also finished last week, and an interesting development was the announcement by Apple that it has ditched its Digital Rights Management (DRM) policy. In the past, a song that was bought off iTunes for US 99 cents could not be shared with others.

DRM has always been regarded as Apple’s means of keeping a tight grip on digital music sales, and Apple now plans on charging a higher price for its music if the consumer wants to share the song or songs that they’ve bought.

There’s no doubt that we will most probably see these products and more at GITEX, the Gulf’s largest computer and electronics expo set to be hosted later this year. The shows go on…

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