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Usually only found in playgrounds, amusement parks or emergency exits — visitors to London’s Tate Modern can now experience the slide in a completely unique environment. German artist Carsten Holler has used the cavernous space of the Turbine Hall as the setting for a highly striking installation formed of five gigantic slides, which corkscrew down from different levels in elaborate spirals.

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By  Monika Grzesik Published  November 17, 2006

|~|slidesbody.gif|~||~|Usually only found in playgrounds, amusement parks or emergency exits — visitors to London’s Tate Modern can now experience the slide in a completely unique environment. German artist Carsten Holler has used the cavernous space of the Turbine Hall as the setting for a highly striking installation formed of five gigantic slides, which corkscrew down from different levels in elaborate spirals. The impressive sculptures created from stainless steel make full use of the height of the hall, the largest being 58 metres long. The slides have a gradient of 30 degrees.

Entitled ‘Test Site’, Holler conceived the sculptural work as an experimental project to explore how slides can be used in public spaces. Visitors are invited to experience the visual spectacle of watching people sliding as well as the inner spectacle of the state of simultaneous delight and anxiety as they descend. Holler describes the work as a “playground for the body and the brain.”
The Unilever Series: Carsten Holler is at the Tate Modern until 9 April 2007. ||**||

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