100%Design

London’s Design Festival is an unmissable highlight on the international design map. Interior enthusiasts from around the globe make a beeline for the UK capital to attend the main event, 100% Design, a dynamic showcase of interior innovation. Hundreds of exhibitors consisting of both established names and up and coming talent, are selected by a panel of leading industry experts — ensuring that only the very best makes the cut.

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By  Monika Grzesik Published  November 6, 2006

|~|londonbody1.gif|~||~|London’s Design Festival is an unmissable highlight on the international design map. Interior enthusiasts from around the globe make a beeline for the UK capital to attend the main event, 100% Design, a dynamic showcase of interior innovation. Hundreds of exhibitors consisting of both established names and up and coming talent, are selected by a panel of leading industry experts — ensuring that only the very best makes the cut. As the city buzzed with inspirational style, CID witnessed the latest product launches and spotted the design stars of the future. Here is a round up of the exhibitors that are ones to watch: ||**|||~|londonbody2.gif|~||~|Wallpaper is back with a bang. Young designers are turning their attention to this formerly frumpy medium with striking results. Erica Wakerly presented ‘Collection 01’ featuring innovative illustrations and abstract patterns, including the bold, geometric ‘Windmills’. Young talent Lizzie Allen’s exclusive hand-printed designs are guaranteed to make an impact. The traditional British scenes have a charming, witty approach. Allen’s colourful, animated illustrations betray a striking attention to detail, which would bring true character to any interior setting. Lithuanian design company Contraforma gave a futuristic form to an old classic with the launch Ku-dir-Ka and Mom Rocking chair. Dutch office interiors company Ahrend launched the 1200 table system by Meyer and Van Schooten. The table reflects the designers’ fascination with light and translucent materials. Made from coloured acrylic with a honeycomb sandwich and toughened glass, the combination of integrated lighting and materials used, combine to produce a subtle defused lighting effect and a striking design. ||**|||~|londonbody3.gif|~||~|UK design firm Deadgood launched some highly eye-catching accessories including the quirky UK Mirror, cut from a single sheet of super polished stainless steel. The award winning Form collection is created solely from solid laminate. The hardwearing chairs combine practicality with elegance and simplicity of design, and are available in over 200 colours and patterns. Molo introduced the unique paper ‘softseating’. Made entirely from recycled, unbleached brown paper, the expandable honeycomb structures compress like a giant book for storage and fan open to create the seating, fastening into shape with a magnetic connection. Various units can be joined, stacked or leant together to create endless possibilities. Despite its delicate appearance, the honeycomb geometry lends the paper impressive strength and the stools support a surprising amount of weight. It also showcased ‘softwall’, made from a highly durable non-woven textile, which expands up to 200 times its compressed size to form white, translucent, freestanding walls. Designer Jason Taylor introduced his Grippy table. The quirky table has a unique design based on a large scrubbing brush. “The original concept came from seeing the brushes on street cleaners and I thought of the challenge to make one that could support a person’s weight,” says Taylor. ||**|||~|londonbody4.gif|~||~|Normann Copenhagen presented Norm 06 — a self-assembly lampshade designed by Simon Karkov. “The design is inspired by nature, by the lilies and the water lilies. Norm 06 follows the Danish design tradition for lamp shades with its shielding of the bulb and the soft light,” said Karkov. Denmark designer Bald and Bang showcased the IQ lighting system by Holger Strom. The unique design is based on single, interlocking modules of translucent white PVC, which create a fine diffused light. Over 21 different designs can be created depending on the number of modules used and choice of assembly pattern. Italian designer Rosanita Marcenaro showcased some striking creations. ‘Pensiero Luminoso’ is made from bulbs interwoven into huge strands of copper wire. Marcanearo said: “The ideal of natural simplicity is represented by copper, the element that wants to live forever. It means desire for a beginning and an end. It represents the complexity of thought and the weaving of feelings.” Lighting played a major part of the show, and for the first time this year 100%Light was devoted exclusively to lighting design. UK designer Scabetti made its first appearance at 100% with the tantalising ‘Drawn to the Light’ chandelier. The light consists of bone china forms that appear to hover around a naked bulb. It has also been explored in other material variations such as oak and glass. Bocci debuted its custom designed chandelier. The 14 Series pendant lights by Omer Arbel are clustered together to create chandeliers of dizzying proportions. Quite subtle individually, the pendants become a striking sculpture when grouped together — the effect being of many tiny candles in floating spheres of water. The light interacts with the imperfections and bubbles of the glass to create a rich halo of light and a striking design. Green Theme A key theme running through this year’s 100% Design show was sustainability. It appears that designers in the UK are taking the green design scene seriously. Many exhibitors focused on the environmentally friendly aspect of their products and a number of seminars were also devoted to this theme, including ‘Sustainable Building’ — which focused on the state of sustainable building practices and materials; and ‘The Future of Sustainability’. The Inheritable Futures stand encouraged visitors to commit their own ideas of sustainability to paper in order to create a ‘gallery of thought’, which will be made into a book after the show. Products with a green focus included Herman Miller’s 99% recyclable Celle Chair and Renewal carpet tiles, which have an average recycled content of 90%. ||**||

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