Will Grocon become the king of speed builders?

It is said the Middle East is leading the way in high-rise construction. From the Burj Dubai — which as we are constantly reminded will be the world’s tallest tower upon completion, to the 1000m-high Mubarak Tower in Kuwait, which rather cheekily is striving to snatch away that record from the Burj before it is even completed — the GCC continues to lead as others across the world struggle to keep up.

  • E-Mail
By  Published  June 17, 2006

|~||~||~|It is said the Middle East is leading the way in high-rise construction. From the Burj Dubai — which as we are constantly reminded will be the world’s tallest tower upon completion, to the 1000m-high Mubarak Tower in Kuwait, which rather cheekily is striving to snatch away that record from the Burj before it is even completed — the GCC continues to lead as others across the world struggle to keep up. So when a company comes up with an innovative system that is set to revolutionise the way tall buildings are built, those in the forward-thinking Middle Eastern market are bound to be pricking up their ears. And that’s exactly what Australian contractor Grocon has done — thanks to its two-floor Lubeca jumpform system. Already used to jumpform the core of the 92-storey Eureka Tower in Melbourne — could the structure’s name have been any more appropriate as the undoubted success on the project certainly merits exclamations of triumph — work time on what is currently Australia’s tallest building was halved. Half as much concrete placing was used, the same could be said of steel fixing, while only half as many joints in the core were also required resulting in a more robust structure. With so many tall buildings in the Middle East, the appeal of Grocon’s jumpform system is obvious. But there’s more — as if halving the time spent on projects wasn’t impressive enough. The two-floor system also offers significant cost savings; for example, less steel and less concrete is needed. And because the system is lifted using hydraulic rams, labour is reduced because everything is mechanised. Grocon has already made its mark in the Gulf. While working on the Rose Tower, on Sheikh Zayed Road, it achieved what it claims is a first for Dubai — three-day construction cycles. But Grocon is not satisfied, it wants to step up its presence in the Gulf and is in talks with Dubai-based developer Tameer about introducing its two-floor jumpform system on a 106-storey tower contract, again located on the city’s arterial highway. With the triumphant success of the Eureka Tower already in the bag and its work on the Rose Tower continuing to bloom, the chances of sealing the Tameer contract look pretty good. And should it win the Princess Tower deal, and then achieve its promise to build the core jump form in around 54 operations instead of 106, Grocon’s Lubeca really would have earned the right to call itself king of the jumpform systems.||**||

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code

Competitions