It’s time to focus on upcoming IT events

2005 was one of the more eventful years in recent times for the IT industry.But what does 2006 hold? Well, if you turn to page 11 of the current issue, you’ll see what we think will be coming up in some of the key technology areas for next year. However, since we at IT Weekly like to keep track of what happens in the industry as much as we do IT, here are a few other predictions of things we think could happen this year.

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By  Peter Branton Published  January 1, 2006

|~|timebody.jpg|~|2006 looks like being an eventful time for the IT industry.|~|The clock is ticking here at IT Weekly. As we rush to close this week’s issue we are also, of course, counting down to the New Year, when you are now reading your copies of IT Weekly. As we pointed out in last week’s issue, 2005 was one of the more eventful years in recent times for the IT industry.But what does 2006 hold? Well, if you turn to page 11 of the current issue, you’ll see what we think will be coming up in some of the key technology areas for next year. However, since we at IT Weekly like to keep track of what happens in the industry as much as we do IT, here are a few other predictions of things we think could happen this year. HP will spin off its printer and PC businesses next year. Or not. HP CEO Mark Hurd will announce that he has no plans to spin off the printer business and journalists everywhere will analyse his remarks for the hidden meaning that will explain when HP is going to spin off its printer business. Or he won’t make any comment on it at all. Either way, expect at least one major analyst/industry figure next year to write a report showing why it makes perfect sense for HP to spin them both off, spin one off or keep them as they are. The CEO of a major networking firm that isn’t Cisco will announce that his company is ready to take on Cisco in one major area. Said CEO will have a good reason as to just why the firm stopped competing in that product area around the time before Microsoft began shipping Windows XP but now believes his firm will do a good job in that market. Microsoft will be criticised for security flaws in some of its products and will release a patch that fixes some of those flaws. And that patch will then make at least some of them worse. Journalists will start writing speculative articles along the lines of “Will Microsoft make its deadline of shipping Vista in the second half of 2006?” in the first half of 2006. Oracle will buy a major software company, then tell everybody that it is going to incorporate its products into Project Fusion. People will get confused about just what Project Fusion is meant to be and will need reminding. Larry Ellison will buy a yacht — or sink one. It will get more headlines in the IT trade press than Project Fusion does. We’re pretty confident that all of these predictions will come true (well, except for the one about Larry’s yacht), so remember you read it first in IT Weekly. Have a good 2006 everybody. ||**||

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