CW starts campaign against counterfeiting

The building sites of the Middle East are awash with counterfeit products and it is beginning to cost quality manufacturers dearly. That is why we have launched our ‘Crush the Counterfeiters’ campaign. The halls of the Dubai Exhibition Centre, where The Big 5 show is taking place this week, are filled with building product firms from across the globe, who all share a common enemy.

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By  Sean Cronin Published  November 20, 2005

|~||~||~|The building sites of the Middle East are awash with counterfeit products and it is beginning to cost quality manufacturers dearly. That is why we have launched our ‘Crush the Counterfeiters’ campaign. The halls of the Dubai Exhibition Centre, where The Big 5 show is taking place this week, are filled with building product firms from across the globe, who all share a common enemy. It is costing the industry billions of dollars every year. And it is already starting to cost contractors and consultants too. There are some construction companies out there who buy these fakes and who know perfectly well what the score is. But the vast majority of firms are probably not aware that the brands they are specifying on their buildings may not be completely legit. With contractor margins under increasing pressure, it is tempting for firms to make savings on materials and products wherever they can. The breakneck speed of the industry here also means that dodgy products can easily slip through the net and be procured and installed before anyone notices. But knowingly specifying counterfeit goods on projects is a dangerous game, as at least a few contractors and consultants operating in Dubai are beginning to learn. The discovery of counterfeit products in a safety-critical context within a building project could cost millions of dollars if those same products need to be removed subsequently. And then there are all the myriad legal implications to consider which impact on developers, contractors and consultants. It is an issue that developers also need to address and nowhere is the need to do that more pressing than in residential tower construction. Build quality issues are increasingly coming to the fore and it is affecting the market. People simply do not want to live 40 storeys up in a structure they do not have absolute confidence in — and why should they? Sean Cronin Editor||**||

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