Show me the money!

Ok… you’ve been working day and night on that server consolidation project that just keeps growing and growing. You are averting disasters left, right and centre and saving the company money by plugging holes in its ill thought out plans. Of course, you’re delighted to be testing yourself in a white hot business environment that will toughen you up and add new skills to your portfolio. But let’s face it, while you’re grateful for all this, you want a raise and you think you deserve it!

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By  Simon Duddy Published  October 23, 2005

|~||~||~|Ok… you’ve been working day and night on that server consolidation project that just keeps growing and growing. You are averting disasters left, right and centre and saving the company money by plugging holes in its ill thought out plans. Of course, you’re delighted to be testing yourself in a white hot business environment that will toughen you up and add new skills to your portfolio. But let’s face it, while you’re grateful for all this, you want a raise and you think you deserve it! Asking for a raise can be daunting, however, whether you are a CIO approaching the CEO or an IT manager walking cap in hand to the CIO. You imagine the worst. Your hands start to sweat, your usual confidence evaporates and you feel like Oliver Twist as your boss bellows “More?” before banishing you back to your cubicle. Like most tasks, timing and preparation are key in making sure you reach a desirable outcome. First you need to be sure that you deserve the raise. Make a list of all the times you improved your employer’s bottom line, managed unruly employees or averted disaster. With success stories up your sleeve, you will be able to counter any arguments that you may not deserve a raise. If you can show how you contributed beyond the call of duty, you have a chance. Knowing the wage standards for your position, industry and experience is also valuable in giving you the ballpark in which to play in. It is equally important not to go in with ridiculously high expectations as it is to ‘low ball’ as either opportunity will be gratefully seized upon by your boss to keep you where he wants you. Timing is an essential part of playing the getting-a-raise game. Often, employees face the dilemma of whether they should wait for their annual performance review or immediately ask for a raise. The old adage ‘strike while the iron is hot’ is well worth listening to after a particularly spectacular implementation but equally setting a performance review as a target can give you sufficient time to show what you can do, day-in day-out, for the company. Both can be effective in getting a raise, and it is important to size up your circumstances, as well as the personality of your boss, when deciding which approach is best for you. It is important not to focus on yourself too much, which can make you come across as selfish and whiny. Your wishes should be presented as a logical consequence of what you have done for the company and can do in the future. Equally, it is important to avoid taking a confrontational tone. The key thing is to think of the raise attempt as a partnership working towards a fair outcome for both parties. If successful, those long hours of toil spent persuading a reluctant board to take telephony on to IP, will be well worth it.||**||

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