Campaign ME Newsletter 29th May 05

This week, I’ve been enjoying a couple of history lessons. I got the first from the excellent essay on page 24 of our print edition by BrandCon’s Tim Broadbent.

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By  Tim Burrowes Published  May 29, 2005

High rise history shows that clients need proof|~||~||~|This week, I’ve been enjoying a couple of history lessons. I got the first from the excellent essay on page 24 of our print edition by BrandCon’s Tim Broadbent. And, although it comes from the days of Queen Victoria, a century later it is just as relevant. And, the lesson is simply this — if you don’t make clients understand the value of what you do, then they won’t pay you what you’re worth. For creatives, it means showing clients that an imaginative, well-executed ad will generate more business than a cheap and nasty one. For media agencies, it may mean showing that not only can you negotiate better ad rates than a client could, but you can plan the execution so effectively their money works harder. And for PRs, it’s about proving that you’ve enhanced perceptions of your client — not just whipped up a decent number of people to show up at the press conference. Speaking of press conferences, that’s where I got my second history lesson of the week. Up on the 33rd floor of Dubai’s Fairmont Hotel was not where I expected to be hearing about such stuff. But, as we report on page five of this week's edition, Bernard Walsh, managing director of DMG World Media, was in a philosophical mood. Talking about the growth of the exhibition industry over here, and in particular last week’s Hotel Show and Office 2005, Walsh observed that although this sort of event is decidedly old hat, it still works. And why does it still thrive? Because it can prove it works. If you invest your marketing budget in an exhibition, you can look at the resulting sales and know exactly the return on investment. Can you do that with media, creative or PR? Only a few clients have taken the trouble to do so. And that’s the issue — if clients don’t bother, they may not even know how much they’d miss you when you were gone. So you’ve got to do it yourself. Otherwise, as many have found to their regret, you’re just a cost to be chopped. It’s a history lesson that’s worth learning.||**||

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