IBM introduces pay-as-you-grow Linux services

As outsourcing and on-demand services gain increasing momentum, Linux is the latest platform to be offered on a ‘pay-as-you-grow’ basis. IBM has introduced Linux Virtual Services, which leverage on the virtual machine capabilities of its zSeries eServers to afford users cost savings and improved levels of efficiency.

  • E-Mail
By  Zoe Moleshead Published  November 4, 2002

Linux on-demand|~||~||~|As outsourcing and on-demand services gain increasing momentum, Linux is the latest platform to be offered on a ‘pay-as-you-grow’ basis. IBM has introduced Linux Virtual Services, which leverage on the virtual machine capabilities of its zSeries eServers to afford users cost savings and improved levels of efficiency.

“We have introduced these services —branded as IBM Managed Hosting —Linux Virtual Services — in response to customer’s need for more efficient use of their IT infrastructure,” says Siamak Kia, business manager, eHosting & outsourcing, IBM Global Services, Middle East, Egypt & Pakistan.

“In a recent Forrester Group report, CIOs were quoting server utilisation at 60% — and our experience is that it is often well below this figure. Our customers simply cannot continue paying for vast IT infrastructures that are so dramatically under-utilised. Linux virtual services gives them an alternative — a means to buy only as much processing power as they need,” he adds.

Customers using transaction intensive applications are the most likely to benefit and sign up for the service, suggests Kia. “But it holds an option for all,” he adds.

As with all on-demand services, such as storage, power or networking, Big Blue’s service allows users to benefit from reduced upfront hardware costs, while enabling them to scale the solution as their business and IT needs increase.

With the Linux-on-demand services, customers purchase storage, processing and networking capacity on a pay as you grow basis to create a virtual server.

“Each Linux instance [virtual server] is completely isolated from others running on the zSeries, providing a similar level of separation as a physical server would. So customers can maintain security levels and get more flexibility in processing power,” explains Kia.

According to Kia, enterprises that adopt this model can align their IT needs more closely with those of their business, and potentially save “anywhere from 20-55% on typical workloads,” he says.

Although Linux-on-demand has not been rolled out within the Middle East region, IBM has a hosting centre at Dubai Internet City, which could cater for such a service. Kia says that there has already been an increasing amount of interest in the virtual services.

“These services are not yet available in the Middle East, though we have seen a vested amount of interest since our corporate announcement,” he comments. “Our service can be introduced wherever there is a market demand for it,” he adds.

Currently, Linux-on-demand is only available on the zSeries of eServers, and there are no plans it to introduce to other servers at the moment. Although Kia says IBM will evaluate new technology as it comes out.

Big Blue believes that the trend for outsourcing and on-demand services will continue to gain momentum as customers increasingly recognise the benefits of such services, and begin to follow the trend for e-sourcing.

As such, IBM’s plans extend beyond just Linux-on-demand and expand into e-business as a whole. Big Blue is looking to reduce the overall IT costs for enterprises, as well as removing the day-to-day headaches of managing and running the infrastructure, therefore enabling customers to get back to basics and focus on their core businesses.

“IBM e-business on-demand services reduce technology costs by enabling customers to access computing infrastructure, business processes and applications in a utility-like model over the internet,” explains Kia.

“It allows customers to focus on their core business, instead of wrangling with increasingly complex technology — while still reaping the benefits of a well executed e-business. E-business gains without the e-business pains,” he concludes.||**||

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code