Time to stop software piracy

Another reseller has been arrested for allegedly selling software piracy, this time in Sharjah. It seems the message on software piracy just doesn’t get through.

  • E-Mail
By  Mark Sutton Published  October 30, 2002

Another reseller has been arrested for allegedly selling software piracy, this time in Sharjah. It seems the message on software piracy just doesn’t get through.

While it is almost understandable that some businesses chose to use illegally copied software, considering the expense of some licences against the relatively low chance of being caught, it amazes me that some resellers think they can get away with it.

The authorities in the region have made it quite clear that they will not tolerate software piracy—the Business Software Alliance and the Arabian Anti-Piracy Alliance are still very actively pursuing those that sell counterfeit software, and the chances of any retailer getting away with selling pirate software are getting smaller.

Yet still they persist. In a recent press statement, Scott Butler, CEO of the Arabian Anti-Piracy Alliance spelled out the position of those on the anti-piracy side: “When a raid is conducted against a reseller, it seriously damages his reputation and the future of his business. We try to avoid such a scenario by communicating with the resellers, asking them to abide by the law and to legalise their activities. Unfortunately when all attempts fail, the authorities are left with one option and that is to conduct a raid against the illegal entity. The sale, manufacture and use of counterfeit software are against the law, and those found guilty of breaking the law, have to face the consequences.”

There are many problems facing resellers in the region. Poor standards of financial control, a rapidly moving, overly-contested market, and often-lacking vendor support make conditions difficult. But is that reason enough to risk imprisonment?

There are unscrupulous companies operating in the region, who avoid customs duty, abuse credit lines, sell to embargoed countries and sell counterfeit goods—but the rest of the channel has to act to weed them out. The authorities in the UAE, Kuwait and Oman especially have shown that they will not tolerate software piracy—the rest of the channel has to make sure they support the efforts to clean up the market.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code