Oracle teams up with EMC for HARD drive

Oracle has teamed up with EMC to deliver the initial application under its Hardware Assisted Resilient Data (HARD) initiative. Oracle’s HARD programme is looking to reduce the costly and time-consuming threat of data corruption.

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By  Zoe Moleshead Published  January 9, 2002

|~||~||~|Oracle has teamed up with EMC to deliver the initial application under its Hardware Assisted Resilient Data (HARD) initiative. Oracle’s HARD programme is looking to reduce the costly and time-consuming threat of data corruption. EMC’s Double Checksum is the first product released as part of the programme, and is designed to detect and prevent data corruptions being written to the storage disk.

Although Oracle’s database management system incorporates a standard data integrity feature to detect data corruption, the increasingly complex nature of IT environments mean that data still has to travel through layers, such as operating systems and host adapters, before reaching the storage system.

EMC’s Double Checksum solution is designed to act as a secondary checkpoint to ensure that any corrupt data is detected before it is written to its Symmetrix box.

“The increasingly complex networked storage environments that we are seeing in the Middle East today require data to flow through many components, including servers, storage systems, switches and host adapters,” explains Thierry Louesse, regional general manager, EMC, Middle East. “Each component has the potential to compromise the integrity of data before it reaches the storage systems. With Double Checksum, data corruption can be identified and corrected,” he adds.

The Double Checksum application works by ‘double checking’ the data once it reaches the Symmetrix and comparing the results with that of the Oracle checksum. If the two are identical then the data is committed to disk.

“EMC’s Double Checksum is the first HARD-related projected to reach the Middle East,” comments Ayman Abouseif, marketing director, Oracle Middle East.

“Together we have developed technology that combats operating system bugs and hardware errors that can cause data corruption. [We’re] ushering in a new standard of information [integrity] across the region,” he adds.

Although both vendors admit data corruption is reasonably rare, its effects can “seriously handicap a business,” says Abouseif.

Data corruption can have a catastrophic effect on a data intensive business, often crippling operations during the many hours it can take to repair the database. It’s much better to prevent data corruption than to fix it after it occurs,” he explains.

Tony Prigmore, senior analyst with The Enterprise Storage Group adds, “By introducing an additional layer of data integrity assurance EMC and Oracle have developed a vital tool for ensuring the availability of customers’ most important business data. Software like this can help customers manage information assests more efficiently and protiably.”

The application is already available for Middle East customers and Abouseif says customers have already registered interest.

“We have a number of joint customers with EMC in the region, [and] many of them have expressed interest in learning more about what the initiative can do for them,” he adds.

The HARD initiative, launched in early November 2001, has garnered a great deal of support and endorsement from vendors, including HP, Compaq, Fujitsu, Sun Microsystems and Veritas.

The programme has also been receiving positive feedback from analysts, as, according to Vernon Turner, group vice president, global enterprise server solutions, IDC, the initiative not only addresses “a much needed function to help customers protect their data. {It also] gives Oracle a step ahead of its competition,” he says.
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