HP talks gaming

The Personal Systems Group of IT behemoth HP last week gave press a taste of what future products to expect from its gaming division, the first such glimpse since the company acquired boutique gaming vendor Voodoo PC in September last year.

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By  Matthew Wade Published  April 8, 2007

The Personal Systems Group of IT behemoth HP last week gave press a taste of what future products to expect from its gaming division, the first such glimpse since the company acquired boutique gaming vendor Voodoo PC in September last year. The products demonstrated by HP in San Francisco –as developed by its main research arm, HP Labs - included a curved, seamless display that fills the gamer's field of view to give what the firm claims is an “incredibly immersive visual experience” as well as a so-called ‘super projector’ capable of high resolution, serious brightness, deep contrast and a wide colour gamut. The firm claims that thanks to its power-packed specifications, this offering is ideal for projecting multiple player games onto a big screen. HP’s gaming innovations are, the firm’s team claimed, not only well-suited to hardcore PC gamers, but due to their power they are also viable for other power-user types of application. HP Labs' display technologies for games have, for example, been incorporated into teleconferencing systems such as HP’s Halo Collaboration Studio and can even provide the basis for inexpensive digital film projection for movie theaters. "Gamers are early adopters and high-performance enthusiasts who can test drive advanced technologies that could someday be broadly applied to other computing capabilities," commented Rahul Sood, the chief technology officer of HP’s Global Gaming Business Unit. "HP is focused on putting its Labs technologies into the hands of our gaming customers and partners to push the limits of today's gaming experience and define new possibilities for the future." The expectation moving forwards is that HP will launch its own range of gaming machines, which would likely compete in the marketplace with competitor Dell’s own XPS range of desktops and laptops. In terms of its price and product positioning, HP’s range should sit between its standard products and Voodoo’s much more high-end power gamer releases. HP acquired VoodooPC, the award-winning US manufacturer of high-performance computer gaming kit, in September 2006. This move followed Dell’s acquisition of popular boutique gaming vendor Alienware earlier in the year. The total gaming market worldwide is estimated at more than $36 billion, according to Informa Media Group, whilst the Consumer Electronics Association estimates that active online gaming subscriptions now exceed 12 million globally. Read more about HP’s gaming media event here: www.hp.com/go/gamingsummit.

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