BorderWare reinforces its online security network

BorderWare Technologies has launched domain and user reputation, a new technology that compliments its existing BorderWare security network (BSN) in an effort to combat increasingly sophisticated online threats.

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By  Sherief Younis Published  February 5, 2007

BorderWare Technologies has launched domain and user reputation, a new technology that compliments its existing BorderWare security network (BSN) in an effort to combat increasingly sophisticated online threats. The product will be immediately available in the Middle East market. The technology works by conducting ongoing, real-time reputation analysis of the content sent from IPs, domains and users across multiple applications like email, web, IM and VoIP. BorderWare claims potentially compromised or infected traffic and individual domain or user behaviours are flagged, graded and rejected, ensuring that legitimate traffic can be sent and received without delay while compromised traffic is rejected. “When traditional reputation services blacklist an entire IP address based on traffic patterns alone, multiple domains and thousands of users that send legitimate email from that IP will be affected,” said Tim Leisman, CEO at BorderWare. “Our new BSN technology breaks through this dilemma by providing a behaviour score at the sender level, thereby accurately separating the good apples from the bad. Companies can trust that their internet communications will be uninterrupted and free from attack and threats,” he added. The technology is focused on elevating threat detection from macro-level IP-only trend analysis, to a real-time assessment of content from multiple users and domains - a critical step in the fight against threats like spam, phishing and flooding. “As the anti-spam market in the Middle East matures, so does the complexity of spam. Of the 180 million messages received daily by BorderWare customers alone, up to 90% of spam emails are detected - an increasing number of which being image-based spam which is particularly hard to detect,” said Dean Bell, regional director MEA & APAC at BorderWare. “With the Internet not being confined to the Middle East, companies are exposed to world-wide threats, including spam. Many of the solutions available today show poor spam detection rates and a high rate of false positives,” he concluded.

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