Cisco nets router deal with STC

Saudi Telecommunications Company (STC) has rolled out Cisco’s high-end CRS-1 platform across the Kingdom, as part of its plans to upgrade its main public data network to support ‘triple-play’ services — voice, video and data.

  • E-Mail
By  Michele Howe Published  November 12, 2006

Saudi Telecommunications Company (STC) has rolled out Cisco’s high-end CRS-1 platform across the Kingdom, as part of its plans to upgrade its main public data network to support ‘triple-play’ services — voice, video and data. The Saudi telco is the first company to deploy the CRS-1 router system — the biggest gun in Cisco’s armoury — in the Middle East and Africa, the vendor said this month. In a fast-track implementation lasting just eight weeks, STC has installed nine units of the new CRS-1 (Cisco Routing System-1) platform across the Kingdom. STC said it implemented the CRS platform to cope with the growing demand for diversified communication services. “We adopted top-notch routing systems to manage the large volumes of data to meet the huge growth in the use of diversified communication services such as voice, video, data and multimedia,” Khaled Al-Ajlan, vice president of the network sector at STC, said. “We will continue to work on providing a data network that will function as a solid base for the next-generation network (NGN). We aspire to offer a wide scope of innovative services for the applications anticipated by our customers,” he added. Other CRS-1 customers globally include Telecom Italia and Telstra in Australia. “We are providing them with a new platform for the data networking service so now STC can provide faster and more far reaching and better data telecommunication services,” Badr Albadr, general manager for Cisco Saudi Arabia, said. He pointed out a key benefit of the platform was that it allowed customers to have higher bandwidth, allowing STC to add voice, video, data and multimedia services. Albadr said there would also be cost savings for STC: “In terms of their operations, since they are standardising on one platform the operational costs will be much lower and subsequently the cost per megabyte will be much lower.”

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code