$52 m Palm Jumeirah district cooling contract win for Shinryo

Palm District Cooling (PDC) has awarded a US $52 million (AED191 million) contract to Japan’s engineering company, Shinryo Corporation, for the construction of two chiller plants on the Palm Jumeirah.

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By  Alison Luke Published  September 23, 2006

Palm District Cooling (PDC) has awarded a US $52 million (AED191 million) contract to Japan’s engineering company, Shinryo Corporation, for the construction of two chiller plants on the Palm Jumeirah. Shinryo will construct the two chillers providing 49,000TR for the second phase of the Palm Trunk Jumeirah development. They will link up with the approximately 15km of main header pipework system that runs around the Palm Trunk, connecting the development’s hotels and apartment blocks. The plants will consist of large centrifugal chillers – widely recognised as the most energy-efficient means of providing cooling for large-scale developments. With 12 large compressor modules, ten having a capacity 4500TR each, the facility will require approximately 44MW of electrical power at peak load conditions during the summer; this is about 50% of the electrical power required for conventional cooling systems. Keith Levers, chief executive officer for Palm District Cooling commented: “Our decision to award the contract to Shinryo followed a comprehensive review of a number of proposals and was based on our requirement to procure the most efficient and cost-effective solution.” The contract with Shinryo is the last of the contracts to be awarded for the district cooling for the whole of Palm Jumeirah. A total of eight plants are being constructed, encompassing a total capacity of 230,000TR on the whole Palm Jumeirah development. Kenji Yamamoto, general manager of Shinryo Corporation, Dubai said: “We are very pleased to partner Palm District Cooling. This is our third project for Palm District Cooling that is being managed through our Dubai office. ” District cooling systems distribute thermal energy in the form of chilled water from a central source to multiple buildings through a network of underground pipes instead of using one local system for each building, thus creating both economic and environmental benefits. In addition to reduced CFC emissions and better noise control, the system uses only 50% of the energy required for conventional methods.

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