SpiralFrog hopping to ME

Universal Music's forthcoming free internet download service - SpiralFrog - will be available to users in the Middle East, SpiralFrog's chairman and founder has confirmed to Windows Middle East.

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By  Cleona Godinho Published  September 7, 2006

Universal Music's forthcoming free internet download service - SpiralFrog - will be available to users in the Middle East, SpiralFrog's chairman and founder has confirmed to Windows Middle East. In an exclusive interview with Windows this week, Joe Mohen, chairman and founder of SpiralFrog stated, “We do plan to launch in the Middle East as the Arab speaking countries are a very important market to us. We also conducted market research in the region in the early days of our company’s development.” Mohen however declined to comment on when exactly the Middle East launch would take place simply commenting, “We will be launching in the Middle East as soon as practical.” In addition to offering a wide variety of English songs, the firm also plans to offer songs in other languages. “It is our intent to offer a complete catalogue of music in Arabic, Spanish and all other languages as soon as we are able. While the anglo-repitoire is important, it is our hope to offer the broadest possible selection of music in every tongue,” added Mohen. Mohen also reckons its multi-lingual song selection will help artists from the Arab region get more exposure. “We also believe that American and British consumers would be willing to listen to music in other languages, and we hope to be the medium by which Arab speaking artists and other music can get more exposure in the anglo-markets,” concluded Mohen. A current alternative to Spiral frog’s service is Apple’s iTunes music service, which offers tunes for 99 cents per song, however this service is not currently available in the region. In August of this year, EMI, one of Universal's key industry competitors, licensed its song catalogue to the soon-to-be-launched Qtrax music service, which is a legal P2P (peer to peer) service. The service will provide free access to digital music, along with a paid-for premium version. According to Brilliant – the firm behind Qtrax - revenue is utilised from targeted advertising to fund the distribution of royalties to artists. However, if consumers wish to burn the song to CD or download to an MP3 player, a fee must be paid. Windows today contacted Qtrax officials to find out whether the service would be available in the Middle East however no comment has been give to date.

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