Dell recalls notebook PC batteries

Dell Worldwide has today announced the voluntary recall of approximately 4.1 million lithium-ion laptop batteries, some of which are in use here in the Middle East. According to Dell, these Sony-manufactured components could, in some rare cases, overheat and cause a fire risk.

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By  Matthew Wade Published  August 15, 2006

Dell Worldwide has today announced the voluntary recall of approximately 4.1 million lithium-ion laptop batteries, some of which are in use here in the Middle East. According to Dell, these Sony-manufactured components could, in some rare cases, overheat and cause a fire risk. These Dell-branded batteries were sold both separately and in response to notebook service calls between April of 2004 and July 18 of this year. The batteries in question are tied to the following Dell laptop models: Dell Latitude D410, D500, D505, D510, D520, D600, D610, D620, D800, D810; Inspiron 6000, 8500, 8600, 9100, 9200, 9300, 500m, 510m, 600m, 6400, E1505, 700m, 710m, 9400, E1705; and Dell Precision M20, M60, M70 and M90 mobile workstations; and XPS, XPS Gen2, XPS M170 and XPS M1710. ‘Dell’ is printed on each of the batteries, followed by one of the following statements: ‘Made in Japan’ or ‘Made in China’ or ‘Battery Cell Made in Japan Assembled in China.’ In addition, each battery has a unique identification number, which appears on a white sticker. Dell is today urging users of the laptops mentioned above to check their battery ID numbers. To then find out whether these components are affected by the flaw, they should either call Dell Middle East direct, on +9714 391 1860, or visit the help website Dell has set-up at www.dellbatteryprogram.com. Here users will find a full list of the affected laptop models, battery ID numbers and even a quick guide explaining where on their batteries to find this ID information. Earlier today, Dell Middle East team was unable to say exactly how many affected batteries are thought to be here in this region. However the firm’s marketing director, Dave Brooke, told Windows Middle East the firm was working very hard to identify its largest affected customer organisations by the end of the day.

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