New design talent in office interiors

The latest newcomer on the Dubai design circuit is 26-year-old Tanya Gyani. She has arrived from India to take on the role of senior designer for OFIS and head up a turnkey service for office interiors. Keen to get involved in the escalating office industry she is confident that there is a real requirement for this type of service in Dubai.

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By  Monika Grzesik Published  August 3, 2006

The latest newcomer on the Dubai design circuit is 26-year-old Tanya Gyani. She has arrived from India to take on the role of senior designer for OFIS and head up a turnkey service for office interiors. Keen to get involved in the escalating office industry she is confident that there is a real requirement for this type of service in Dubai. “It is important in office design to understand the real needs of the client. Do they sit at computers for eight hours a day? Is their work focused on communication? I can translate these needs into tangible spaces. If space planning and office design caters properly to the client, productivity will increase.” Gyani describes her style as being inspired by nature and organic elements. “In terms of materials, natural light is an inspiration. I aim to provide soft, comfortable spaces using pastels, light woods, semi-lustrous metals and fluid forms. I like to give the environment a diffused, transparent, neutral look using bright colours as an accent. I go for wood accented with metal, as this look is very high end. I like wooden flooring; parquet has a very classic look. Luckily acoustic mats make it easier to sell to people concerned about the noise.” Gyani explains the importance of selecting the right colour palette in office design: “I use bright reds and oranges in areas where you need perking up such as in the kitchen. However, warm tones in an office can excite you too much and instill feelings like anger, which will reflect in your work. Lighting is equally important. In a working environment, diffused or natural light is better for productivity. Overly bright light can be detrimental, which is why high rise office towers in Dubai with floor to ceiling glass windows always film the glass to ensure the light is not too harsh and provides a more aquatic look.” Gyani explains how office design has developed over the years: “Offices used to be very sterile places. Now they are part of the corporate culture and identity. The work environment has become very much focused on employee comfort. We are moving away from a 9-5 work ethic towards a 24/7 concept. People are starting to incorporate residential elements into offices like sofas, couches and areas based on interaction such as small lounges and sit outs.” Having been shortlisted to be among the top 20 of India’s Creative Future 2007 she will soon be jetting off to participate at the ‘Creative Future School’ at IMM Bangalore. In the meantime Gyani is focused on researching the latest trends in office design. With a keen interest in sustainable design, she hopes to introduce some eco-friendly products to the OFIS range. “Dubai is a very materialistic city with a superficial, new feel. The culture here is not educated in sustainability and unlike the US and UK, that market is still to be introduced.” This is something she is determined to change. It seems there is a fresh new talent on the office interiors scene.

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