LG points to finger-secure laptops

LG Electronics has decided to give buyers of its latest dual-core laptops an extra level of security by adding AuthenTec fingerprint sensors to its dual-core Express series notebook PCs.

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By  Matthew Wade Published  March 26, 2006

LG Electronics has decided to give buyers of its latest dual-core laptops an extra level of security by adding AuthenTec fingerprint sensors to its dual-core Express series notebook PCs. LG has selected AuthenTec’s EntréPad 2501A sensor for its M1, P1, S1 and T1 Express Dual notebook models. This fingerprint sensor allows only authorised users to access information stored on the computer. The sensor works by a user simply sliding their finger across its surface. In addition, the reader can be used to encrypt files and folders for an additional layer of data security. “Biometrics is moving quickly from fiction to reality and is being widely incorporated in many electronic devices,” commented K.W Kim, the president of LG Electronics’s Middle East and Africa operations. “It is considered a reliable solution for protecting the user’s identity as it recognises a unique and unalterable feature.” The fingerprint scanner LG has opted for is based upon AuthenTec’s so-called ‘TruePrint’ technology, which LG claims is the only ‘sub-surface’ solution on the market today. In plain English, this means that TruePrint sensors can read fingerprints below the skin’s surface so that their accuracy is not affected by common skin complaints, which can impair the ability of other sensors to take accurate fingerprint images. LG is not the only notebook vendor to offer fingerprint security technologies with its products. Lenovo for instance offers such features with some of its own laptop PCs. In a related story, a security researcher recently claimed that Microsoft’s PC Fingerprint Reader is less secure than many of its users might think. Mikko Kiviharju, a Finnish military security researcher, highlighted a problem with the software giant’s PC authentication device, which has been on the market since the end of 2004. However, in the software giant’s defence, Microsoft’s reader is not marketed as a security tool, but as more of a convenience for users.

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