Next-generation storage to use holographic technology

US-based InPhase Technologies and Hitachi Maxell Ltd. are working on a technology called Tapestry Holographic Memory that uses laser beams to save 300GB of information onto a single disc

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By  Cleona Godinho Published  December 7, 2005

US-based InPhase Technologies and Hitachi Maxell Ltd. are working on a technology called Tapestry Holographic Memory that uses laser beams to save 300GB of information onto a single disc. This means early adopters will be able to easily store high-definition content such as movies, music and large data files on a single disc rather than using several. According to InPhase, holographic technology allows millions of bits of data to be written and read in parallel with one flash of light. The firm claims this method of access makes performance better than that of current optical storage devices. Each holographic disc will be able to store up to 300GB of data, which the firm claims can be recorded at 160 megabits per second. While disc capacity has increased considerably compared to optical media such as dual-layer DVDs (8.5GB) and Blu-ray discs (which offer 50GB of storage at maximum), the physical dimensions of the holographic disc remain relatively compact at 13cm in diameter. “We believe the capacity and data rates of holographic storage will be critical to achieving the breakthrough improvements in work flow and cost reduction,” stated Nelson Diaz, CEO of InPhase Technologies. Though the technology will first be adopted by the broadcasting industry, Holographic technology should find its way into homes thereafter. According to InPhase Technologies, holographic drives and discs will be available for purchase by the end of 2006.

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