Huawei spends US$20 million on training and technical assistance

The training facilities cover an area of 300 square metres and comprise13 classrooms and labs, with a capacity of 150 trainees at any given time

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By  Tawanda Chihota Published  December 5, 2005

Chinese telecoms manufacturer Huawei Technologies has inaugurated a regional technical assistance centre and a training centre in Cairo, aimed at educating partners, customers and sub-contractors of the company’s extensive portfolio of telecoms equipment. The training facilities cover an area of 300 square metres and comprise13 classrooms and labs, with a capacity of 150 trainees at any given time. At the time of inauguration, a total of 58 training programmes were available. “Our entry into Egypt four years ago and our knowledge and experience is equal to the best in the world,” says Tian Feng, vice president of Huawei Technologies. “The strategic location of Egypt is important to us,” he adds. The total size of the investment in the two centres amounts to US$20 million. Global revenues for Huawei in 2004 amounted to US$5.58 billion, with the vendor projecting that this will top US$8.5 billion this year. 40% of revenues in 2004 were generated from outside of China, and by 1H05 this percentage had rocketed to 62% of vendor’s US$4.1 billion revenues during the period. Huawei is enjoying particular success in the Middle East and North African (MENA) region in the areas of CDMA technology, switching, broadband, Intelligent Networking, Next Generation Networks and IP. “We have eight regional offices across the world and over 70 branch offices outside of China,” explains May Bassiouny, training centre director. “We do not have a particular group in mind for our training and technical assistance centres, we are intent on sharing our knowledge, experience and equipment with customers, sub-contractors and partners,” she adds. Huawei is also in the process of identifying a partner in Dubai for the establishment of a distribution hub. The Chinese vendor is looking to have the process completed by the end of March 2006, but has been faced with difficulties in identifying the right partner. “Some (potential) partners do not cover the whole region, so that has been a problem,” comments Sun Hanwu, vice president of Huawei for the MENA region.

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